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Search Results: 6 found, Filter: Label, Faraway Press

Andrew Chalk / A Light At The Edge Of The World / CD / Faraway Press / Faraway Press 025
Andrew Chalk / A Light At The Edge Of The World / CD / Faraway Press / Faraway Press 025
Elodie / Balayes De La Main Du Hasard / Vinyl LP / Faraway Press / FP030
Performed by Timo van Luijk & Andrew Chalk Guitar: Tom James Scott / Korogi: Daisuke Suzuki . “It is as though the storm is scolding the foot of the mountain And the petals of the cherry tree fall like snow The moment fills me with compassion The rains of spring arrive and fall like tears The blossom falls like rain It is a world full of regret”
Andrew Chalk / Everyone Goes Home When The Sun Sets / CD / Faraway Press / FP027
Following last years 'A Light at the Edge of the World' (a single piece), finds a new collection of 19 pieces sequenced in story-like chapter and verse from memories and melodies of a nostalgic past. Played more in thoughtful focus and with a lyrical narrative. The album closes with a solstice in midwinter. 'Everyone Goes Home When The Sun Sets' was mastered for CD release by Denis Blackham and is packaged in handmade gatefold mini LP style sleeve with Japanese language obi.
Elodie / Le Manteau D'Étoiles / Vinyl LP / Faraway Press / Faraway Press 026
The fifth full length album by Elodie, here expanding on the first concert as a quartet given in Leuven, Belgium in November 2012 -with Tom James Scott : piano and Jean-Noel Rebilly : clarinet. “Le Manteau D’étoiles” collects ten airy instrumental spheres glowing and evaporating in a universal infinity like any moment in the panorama of everyday life. Released on Andrew Chalk’s Faraway Press label in an edition of 300 copies. The album contains a specially printed double-sided insert and postcard set, printed on 350 gramme cream paper stock. Mastering and cut by Noel Summerville at 3345 Lacquer cut, pressing on 160gramme vinyl, sleeve design and layout by Timo van Luijk, Andrew Chalk and Jos Moers. Faraway Press.
Elodie / Odyssee / CD / Faraway Press / FP028
Elodie here featuring core members Timo van Luijk and Andrew Chalk, playing live in Germany in 2015. Performing a pure duet of flute and string synthesizer over one episodic track 'Odyssee', a poetic and melancholy synchronous soundtrack to a film made and shown by van Luijk on the same evening. 'Odyssee' was mastered for CD release by Denis Blackham and is packaged in handmade gatefold mini LP style sleeve with Japanese language obi. Faraway Press.
Andrew Chalk / Violin by Night / CD / Faraway Press / FP 019
Whenever a new vinyl release by Andrew Chalk surfaces, several things are fairly certain: it will be a beautiful object, it will be expensive, and it will be worth it. Packaging-wise, Violin by Night hits impressive new heights in both lavishness and mystery. The corresponding songs, on the other hand, are atypically brief and melodic, often more closely resembling a damaged Romantic classical recording than anything drone-like. The album opens with "A New Heaven," unfolding a gentle, submerged-sounding piano or harmonic motif over a very minimal, murky, and vaporous bed. It is extremely simple melodically, but Chalk creates some impressive things dynamics, making all the notes ripple, shimmer, and decay like droplets on a moonlit pool. This sets the tone for the album quite beautifully, as almost everything that follows seems evocative of some sort of remote nocturnal grove. It isn't entirely an idyllic one though, as the album is populated with a number of pieces ("Violin by Night," for example) that feel elusive and spectral, drifting in and out of the sonic foreground like a strange, shifting mist. It is difficult to tell exactly what Chalk is playing on individual pieces due to the heavy processing (and because the liner notes are entirely in Japanese), but much of the album sounds like someone playing a lonely, melancholy organ solo somewhere in the distance, only snatches of which are audible due to the vagaries of the wind and the acoustics of the surrounding landscape. Of course, there are a number of exceptions. "Red Horse," for example, is very much a drone piece, augmenting its darkly queasy underbelly with some sort of bizarre overtone experiment that doesn't quite sustain my interest. The other departures work much better though, as the shadowy, flange-heavy "Then and Now" sounds like a chamber ensemble heard though a thick fog of hallucinogens while "The Falling City" sounds like an understated, less emotionally ravaging cousin to one of Arvo Pärt's more sorrowful string pieces ("Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten," for example). "The Falling City" is an uncharacteristically melodic and unprocessed work for Chalk, achieving an impressive orchestral grandeur that is not at all what I have come to expect from him. It is difficult to say where this release falls within Chalk's ouevre quality-wise, as he's responsible for a number of stellar albums. The important thing is that it is almost uniformly excellent, although the increased focus on melody coincides with a necessary decrease in song length–I miss the immersiveness of Chalk's more long-form work, as some of these songs are over before they fully take hold of me. Also, I always appreciated that his work asked a lot of patience and focus from me as a listener. The occasional overt melodies on Violin by Night may be a bit simpler and more accessible, but the shifted balance between space, texture, and melody works quite nicely and I would certainly be happy with wider recognition and increased demand for Andrew Chalk albums. I can't complain. Andrew might though, as the physical packaging for this album was handmade and seems like it was pretty damn labor-intensive (cloth, wood, great anthropomorphic animal art, everything in kanji, etc.). Brainwashed."